Ube Waffles! (with pictures and recipe)

The other week, Michi was talking about waffles on Twitter. Specifically, she mentioned having (and now, missing) ube-flavored waffles at a Filipino food festival, and though I’d never had ube in a waffle before, I immediately craved them too.

Ube is a purple yam popular in Filipino desserts. It has a subtle spice flavor, like a potato grown in cinnamon dirt. I’ve had it in cake, ice cream, and of course, in halo-halo, the best of all summer treats. But, I’d never thought to put it into a waffle. Worse, I rarely see it in my little college town at all, even though I go to the local Asian market often enough that the owner teases me – every time – about how I need to try cooking Chinese food instead of Filipino. I hadn’t seen ube extract, which is what most people cook with in the US. I thought, well, I could get it on Amazon…

Just in case, I went over to the market and surprise! I walk in and she immediately tells me they got a little batch of fresh ube that morning. We were go for waffles!

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Ube uncooked: sliced open (top left) and peeled (bottom right)

First, I peeled and steamed them. After about 20 minutes on the stove, I got this:

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So purple!

After letting them cool, I mixed them with an equal amount of unsweetened coconut milk. Using an immersion (stick) blender, I ended up with a soft, smooth, puree.

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It was about the consistency of yogurt.

Then, I needed to make the waffles. I wanted to do something simple and easy to repeat, so I used regular Bisquick for the dry ingredients. Normally, that calls for Bisquick, whole milk, one egg, and some vegetable oil. My recipe:

  • 2 cups Bisquick
  • 1 cup ube mix (so, 1/2 cup steamed and cool ube, 1/2 cup unsweetened coconut milk, blended together)
  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 cup milk

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I stirred together the ube mix and eggs first, then added in 1/2 cup of milk. I reserved the other 1/4 because I wasn’t certain I’d need it.

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You don’t need to sift this.

After then blending in the Bisquick, I went ahead and added the rest of the milk, to get that perfect batter. No chunks, but not too thin. (I skipped the vegetable oil entirely – I rarely use it in baking. You won’t miss it.)

I have an extra-large Belgian waffle maker, but it cooked exactly as my other waffles do, so I doubt you’d need to do anything special to make these in a regular waffle maker. Because the ube – steamed by itself, or mixed with the coconut milk – will last fine in the refrigerator for a few days, you can do that part ahead of time if you like.

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Once cooked, they are golden brown on the outside, with the same crispy texture you’d expect a waffle to have. (I do miss the bright purple once it’s lightened up by the other ingredients, but not enough to add food coloring. Your mileage may vary.)

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Inside, they were slightly lavender, and fill of the tiny air bubbles that make waffles fluffy. Most importantly, they still had that subtle ube flavor. Delicious!

This recipe made 4 extra-large Belgian waffles, with nothing leftover, at about 350 calories each.

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2 thoughts on “Ube Waffles! (with pictures and recipe)

  1. Wow! They looks so delicious since I love ube! Drools! 🙂

    • They were excellent. I think it would be easy to make them more dessert like, by adding shredded coconut and topping with whipped cream, but I ate these with a little melted butter and it was perfect.

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